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Could Anisometropia Be Increasing Your Fall Risk?

Could Anisometropia Be Increasing Your Fall Risk?

How sure are you that your glasses give you the best vision possible? One fairly common vision issue in seniors is widely under-diagnosed, recent research has shown. According to a study published recently in Optometry and Vision Science, significant anisometropia, as the condition is known, is 10+ times more likely to be found in seniors over age 75 than in younger patients.

Seniors with this condition have vastly different refractive power in each eye, meaning they also need different prescriptions for each eye. The researchers behind this study say that older adults who do not have the correct eyeglass prescription for each eye could be at a greater risk for falls than those who have the issue but also have the proper prescription. Falls, of course, can lead to injuries, health complications, loss of independence, or even death.

The link between anisometropia and falls is due to blurred vision. One eye sees a drastically larger image than the other, creating blurriness and hampering depth perception. Learning you have the issue and correcting it are important steps toward making sure your risk of falls is minimized.

While the condition can usually be corrected with glasses, many times your brain has tried to adapt to using only the stronger eye. You will have to learn to use both eyes again. To help this process, you may not receive the full prescription in the beginning. Instead, you will get a series of prescription lenses with increasing strengths over time. By doing this, most patients can adapt relatively quickly.

According to the National Institute on Aging, those over age 65 are a high-risk group and should receive a visual examination and screening. This is the best way to make sure you have the prescription you need for each eye.

It should be noted that store-bought reading glasses are especially troublesome for seniors with anisometropia. They may help you see, but they will only be aiding your strong eye. In fact, they can be especially dangerous if you attempt to walk or drive in them, since they create even more difference between your strong eye and your weak eye.

Anisometropia has been discovered to be more common in seniors than doctors once believed. It can cause issues with blurred vision and depth perception. Getting regular vision screenings can help ensure your vision is not increasing your fall risk.

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